Eagleseye

Astronomy Blog

Lunt Solar Scope – First Dabblings

by on May.16, 2015, under Astronomy Blog

After receiving my first solar telescope on Tuesday, today I finally got a chance to have a real play and try some more imaging with it, playing with different settings. I am extremely pleased with the performance of the scope so far.
So much detail is visible visually, then when I use my DMK41 camera, even more detail becomes visible in my images.
There’s still a bit of a way to go to get the technique right, especially to get consistent final results.
To show you what I have managed to capture so far here are a few of the images I took this morning.
What an absolutely astonishing and amazing object our nearest star is.
As you can imagine, I’m flipping well chuffed.

Sun20150516DiskPFlat

video0012 12-08-42P2Prom

video0005 11-51-40P2Flat

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Cambridge Astronomical Association – Rosetta & Philae

by on May.13, 2015, under Astronomy Blog

On the evening of Friday the 15th of May I will be presenting my popular Rosetta & Philae talk to Cambridge Astronomical Association at the Institute of Astronomy.

It’s been a long time since I’ve been to a CAA meeting, so I’m really looking forward to it.

So, if you’re in the area, come along, say “Hello” and enjoy my presentation.

RosettaTalk

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Sky Diary for May 2015

by on May.01, 2015, under Astronomy Blog

My Sky Diary for May 2015 is now available for free download in two pdf file formats from my Web site.
A short printable version and a long version with full graphics and maps.

Although nights are getting shorter and lighter, there are still some very nice sights to be seen at this time of year.

http://www.eagleseye.me.uk/SkyDiary.html

 

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Where to find Comet 67P This Summer

by on Apr.18, 2015, under Astronomy Blog

With the recent launch of the Rosetta ground-based campaign to observe comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from April until December 2015, I thought I would publish some maps showing where we might be able to find Comet 67P later this summer.

The comet has already been recovered by imagers in Chile.
Realistically us observers based in the UK are unlikely to pick it up until mid – late July and onwards.

The comet will at this time be moving through Taurus and into Gemini. It will be visible fairly low in the early morning eastern sky. It should be about 12th even 11th magnitude at this time, and that’s about the brightest it will get, being somewhat around the Sun in it’s orbit
This map shows the path of the comet below as seen from Earth.

So it is in a very distinct and easy to find part of the sky. Mid-month sees the comet passing between The Pleiades and Hyades open star clusters and out through the horns of the Bull by the end of July .
On the 8th of August, just 5 days before perihelion, the comet passes straight through the small open cluster NGC2158. This is a smaller cluster right next door to the much bigger M35 (NGC 2168). It just skirts M35 a little while later.
This is shown in the map below.
So we have some very familiar and distinct markers to help us find this very interesting comet. It is certainly a unique opportunity to observe a comet with a space probe going round it that I certainly don’t want to miss.

 

More on the ground-based campaign available here:
http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/rosetta-ground-based-campaign

Maps produced using the free Planetarium Software C2A:
http://www.astrosurf.com/c2a/english/index.htm

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Rosetta Ground-Based Campaign.

by on Apr.15, 2015, under Astronomy Blog

Amateur astronomers are being called on to take part in a Rosetta ground-based campaign to observe comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from April until December 2015.

Click on this link for more details.

http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/rosetta-ground-based-campaign

There is also a Facebook group dedicated to it.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/paca.rosetta67p/

Some dedicated observers have already recovered the comet now it has passed solar conjunction.

Image below from their Web site:
http://lesia.obspm.fr/comets/lib/display-obs1.php?Num=13673

 

 

Realistically us in the UK are unlikely to get hold of it until late July.

The comet will at this time be moving through Taurus and into Gemini, and visible fairly low in the early morning eastern sky. It could be about 11th or 12th magnitude at this time, and that’s about the brightest it will get.
Map shows the path of the comet below.

On the 8th of August, just 5 days before perihelion, the comet passes straight through the small open cluster NGC2158, which is a smaller cluster right next door to the much bigger M35 (NGC 2168).
So there really is no excuses for not knowing where to look.

 

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Lincoln Astronomical Society – 7th April 2015

by on Apr.08, 2015, under Astronomy Blog

Before my talk last night we were treated to a fine Sun Dog to the side of the observatory of Lincoln Astronomical Society.

LincolnAS

I did my talk entitled “In the Footsteps of Piazzi Smyth – Astronomical Adventures in Tenerife” to Lincoln Astronomical Society  last night.

AdvTenerife

There were about 40 people attending that evening and if the multitude of questions afterwards are anything to go by my talk went down very well indeed.
Many thanks to Lincoln Astronomical Society for giving me such a warm reception in their wonderful facilities.
I really enjoyed the evening, making the journey there well worth taking.
Hopefully they will have me back for another talk in the not too distant future.

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Bye Bye Comet Lovejoy – 6th April 2015

by on Apr.06, 2015, under Astronomy Blog

It was gone 9pm BST before it finally got dark. By the time I got set up and the skies were finally dark enough Comet C/2015 F3 (SWAN) was reachable, but disappearing rapidly behind my house. Comet Lovejoy C/2014 Q2 wouldn’t be too far away either. I restricted myself to short exposures expecting the comet to slip behind the eves of the house all too soon. I was surprised to get 34x 40 second exposures before it finally slipped from view. It’s still showing a short tail. Image taken using 190 Mac-Newt and D5100 Nikon DSLR, so a much closer view that I have been taking previously.

Picture saved with settings embedded.

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Venus – Elusive Cloud features. 22nd March 2015

by on Apr.03, 2015, under Astronomy Blog

On the 22nd of March I finally got a chance to test out my Venus.
Using my 190 Mac-Newt and a Barlow lens, I focussed on a bright star and then slew to Venus over in the western sky.
Using my DMK41 camera I adjusted the exposure to capture the planet, but not over-expose it.

I took 1 minute AVI files of the planet and then processed them in Registax.
This was the best of the lot.
Venus-201303220003 15-03-22 19-23-37PAlthough a bit hazy, it does look like the filter is just about bringing out some very subtle cloud features.

If I can get the image scale a bit bigger, especially as Venus gets nearer to Earth over the next few months, I should hopefully be able to reveal even more.

Dave

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Birmingham Astronomical Society – 31st March 2015

by on Apr.01, 2015, under Astronomy Blog

Last night I did my ever popular multi-media presentation “Rosetta & Philae: From Concept to Reality”, to Birmingham Astronomical Society last night.

RosettaTalk

As per usual the talk went down extremely well.

My next talk is at Lincoln Astronomical Society on the 7th of April when I will be talking about “In the Footsteps of Piazzi Smyth: Astronomical Adventures in Tenerife”.

Dave

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My Sky Diary for April 2015

by on Mar.29, 2015, under Astronomy Blog

My Sky Diary for April 2015 is now available for free download in two pdf file formats from my Web site. A short printable version and a long version with full graphics.

It includes all the latest details about the now fading Comet Lovejoy C/2014 Q2.

http://www.eagleseye.me.uk/SkyDiary.html

EEOTSApr15

Enjoy.

Dave

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